Mahwindo feels the heat

HARARE - Socialite Wanisai Mutandwa aka Mahwindo says her music promotion company Sound Blaze will be gender sensitive with a bias towards female artistes as most male promoters are there to exploit female talent.

Mahwindo said most Zimbabwean female artistes, especially musicians and dancers are struggling as most recording studios and promotional companies are run by men who have a bias towards male artistes.

Early this year, Mahwindo left Supa Mandiwanzira’s Six Finger Records to jointly form  an independent company, Sound Blaze Promotions with two other women partners.

Though the company is still in its infancy stage, they have already hired their equipment stage to political parties including Zanu PF, churches, corporate and musicians among others, a development that left their male counterparts green with envy.

“It is hard to survive in this male-dominated industry. It’s dog eat dog kind of business but we are trying our best.

“We have brought in state-of-the-art stage equipment in the country, a curvy one. This gave us a competitive advantage in showbiz. The development forced those already in the business to slash their prices,” the-mother-of-one-said.

“Our competitors reviewed their charges downwards just to counter our business.” Mutandwa told the Daily News that she is ready to fight and improve the lives of female artistes in showbiz.

“Female artistes are struggling to break through in the showbiz because the means of productions are owned by their men counterparts. Owing to this, female artistes at times are left out at crucial events.

“For instance, few if not any female artistes are billed to perform at the weekend concerts featuring Jamaican artistes Demarco and Beenie Man because the concerts are being organised by men,” she said.

“We are planning a women festival in December so as to empower women artistes in the country.

“The festival will feature top international female artistes who are coming to boost faith and confidence in our local girls.” Mutandwa whose childhood dream was to be a DJ, said even though established music promoters, mainly men, are after her downfall she believes she has a long way to go in showbiz.

“I started following music since 1996 and I have matured with age. I now understand some of the dynamics of the industry hence I don’t doubt my future.

“Of course the economic situation is bad but so far so good. I can’t complain. I thank God we have managed to buy new and state-of-the-art public address system together with screens to use on our events,” she said.

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