Zanu PF disowns Gumbura

HARARE - Zanu PF has dismissed claims by End Time-Message ministries founder and pastor, Robert Gumbura that the party gave him permission to use its structures to donate food and goods to the Mabvuku/ Tafara constituency.

Gumbura who earlier told the Daily News that he had not considered entering into politics said he had requested the help of Zanu PF to get access to the community through its structures.

Gumbura is said to be considering running for the Mabvuku parliamentary seat.  

An official at the Zanu PF provincial offices said they never processed such an application and Gumbura could have taken advantage of certain connections he has with people in the party.

“As Zanu PF we are not yet holding meetings on such matters. And it is not up to us to grant him that permission if it is a charity organisation.”

“Those kind of issues go through the ministry of Labour and Social Welfare,” the official said.

While Zanu PF has banned campaigning for elections until after the referendum, soliciting for votes has already started in most constituencies in the country including Mabvuku on a Zanu PF ticket using church resources to entice supporters of the former ruling party to vote for him in primary elections.

Gumbura is alleged to be battling it out with Zimbabwe Minerals Development (ZMDC) chairman, Godwills Masimirembwa and young businessman Chamu Chiwanza for the right to represent Zanu PF in Mabvuku.

Allegations against the pastor are that he has been using church facilities and donor funds to uplift his political career.

However, Gumbura said, his donations to the community were a way to get to know the people in the constituency as he intends to set up a church in the area.

Gumbura said his church donated mealie meal, peanut butter and buckets, saying the people in Mabvuku experience water problems and can now use the buckets to store the precious liquid.

He said after the donations, some people approached him, wanting him to run as a legislator for the area. - Staff Writer

Comments (5)

You are either a politician, or a preacher. The two do not mix like water and oil.

Riman10 - 8 March 2013

Read Joseph he became a Governor in Egypt, read abt Daniel, Misheck, Shadreck and Abedinigo they become Governors in Babylon. The Apostles were persecuted and killed because some didn't ve connections or positions or influence in Politics. So as Christians we need that Political power to for the sake of spreading the Gospel and building our schools for our children to grow and learn in a clean and christian inviroment without worldly influence. As Christians we are in this world to take over,to possess,to inherit the earth. To take what belongs to us from the devil, imagine if the president was an Endtime message believer! No women was going to walk in the street wearing mini-skirt or trousers even putting make-up like Jezebel. The devil is a liar! Jesus Christ is Lord. If Zanu Pf disowns Apostle Gumbura God owners him!

Divine King - 14 March 2013

Pastors in Pennsylvania are overcoming their fears and rising to the challenge of preaching on political and cultural issues from the pulpit. On Sunday, the Pennsylvania Pastors Network launched its second Pulpit Sunday where preachers in the state didn't shy away from politics. "Pastors – don't be afraid to teach truth. The world is unafraid to teach lies and erroneous ideas, even though those faulty ideas that often lead to destructive relationships and community demise," said Pastor Jim Arcieri of Community Bible Fellowship Church in Red Hill, Pa. "This is God's world, and we are stewards of it, which includes the civil realm. Yes, politics can be a very dirty and dishonest business, and often we see such evidence in the news. Yet, do not be discouraged and give up; stand for righteousness in all four areas of life (the individual, the familial, the ecclesiastical, and the civil), no matter what results." Arcieri noted that many pastors are afraid to speak on politics but they don't have to be because politics can be defined as "what is happening on certain issues of today." And the Bible addresses the civil realm of life "quite often," he stated. "Preaching the whole counsel of God cannot be avoided," he added. Pulpit Sunday was launched by PPN – which describes itself as a network of Biblically-faithful clergy and church liaisons whose objective is to build a permanent infrastructure of like-minded clergy – in August. Pastors throughout Pennsylvania are signing up to preach about cultural and moral issues every first Sunday of the month until the November elections. "Certainly in this time in America's history where gridlock and confusion seems to prevail, it is our contention that it is the moral compass provided by the Scripture that alone can set aright the ship of state and meet the needs of society's problems," Karyn S. Price, Public Relations manager for PPN, told The Christian Post. "Pulpit Sundays are being promoted also to empower pastors to fulfill their Biblical and constitutional duty to preach about moral and cultural issues of the day." The goal, she clarified, is not to "politicize the pulpit," but rather "to talk about prevalent cultural issues – all of which are dealt with in the Scripture – that often end up being politicized by candidates." The network does not promote any party or specific candidates and it does not encourage pastors to do so. Some of the issues that pastors are encouraged to speak out on include the sanctity of life, marriage, family, taxes, debt and the economy. "With topics like sex and politics long being considered as taboo for preachers to address from the pulpit, Bible-believing Christians – and the society at large – are left without firm, faith-based instruction on issues of moral or cultural relevance," Price pointed out. "This has in turn facilitated to cultural embracing of moral relativism and the rejection God and absolute truth. "We are encouraging pastors to adopt Pulpit Sundays to countermand this phenomenon and to have an immediate, positive impact on today's culture, especially as it relates to upcoming elections." She stressed, "Now is the time for Christians to stand up and vote based on the Biblical and constitutional principles they hold dear, but without clear teaching from the pulpit about what the Bible says about marriage, life, or sex, how can we expect them to vote bearing these principles in mind?" PPN is a project of Let Freedom Ring, a nonprofit organization that promotes limited federal government, the "original intent of the Framers of the Constitution," free enterprise and equal opportunity, and family as the basic building block of society, among other things.

atrick - 25 March 2013

Pastors in Pennsylvania are overcoming their fears and rising to the challenge of preaching on political and cultural issues from the pulpit. On Sunday, the Pennsylvania Pastors Network launched its second Pulpit Sunday where preachers in the state didn't shy away from politics. "Pastors – don't be afraid to teach truth. The world is unafraid to teach lies and erroneous ideas, even though those faulty ideas that often lead to destructive relationships and community demise," said Pastor Jim Arcieri of Community Bible Fellowship Church in Red Hill, Pa. "This is God's world, and we are stewards of it, which includes the civil realm. Yes, politics can be a very dirty and dishonest business, and often we see such evidence in the news. Yet, do not be discouraged and give up; stand for righteousness in all four areas of life (the individual, the familial, the ecclesiastical, and the civil), no matter what results." Arcieri noted that many pastors are afraid to speak on politics but they don't have to be because politics can be defined as "what is happening on certain issues of today." And the Bible addresses the civil realm of life "quite often," he stated. "Preaching the whole counsel of God cannot be avoided," he added. Pulpit Sunday was launched by PPN – which describes itself as a network of Biblically-faithful clergy and church liaisons whose objective is to build a permanent infrastructure of like-minded clergy – in August. Pastors throughout Pennsylvania are signing up to preach about cultural and moral issues every first Sunday of the month until the November elections. "Certainly in this time in America's history where gridlock and confusion seems to prevail, it is our contention that it is the moral compass provided by the Scripture that alone can set aright the ship of state and meet the needs of society's problems," Karyn S. Price, Public Relations manager for PPN, told The Christian Post. "Pulpit Sundays are being promoted also to empower pastors to fulfill their Biblical and constitutional duty to preach about moral and cultural issues of the day." The goal, she clarified, is not to "politicize the pulpit," but rather "to talk about prevalent cultural issues – all of which are dealt with in the Scripture – that often end up being politicized by candidates." The network does not promote any party or specific candidates and it does not encourage pastors to do so. Some of the issues that pastors are encouraged to speak out on include the sanctity of life, marriage, family, taxes, debt and the economy. "With topics like sex and politics long being considered as taboo for preachers to address from the pulpit, Bible-believing Christians – and the society at large – are left without firm, faith-based instruction on issues of moral or cultural relevance," Price pointed out. "This has in turn facilitated to cultural embracing of moral relativism and the rejection God and absolute truth. "We are encouraging pastors to adopt Pulpit Sundays to countermand this phenomenon and to have an immediate, positive impact on today's culture, especially as it relates to upcoming elections." She stressed, "Now is the time for Christians to stand up and vote based on the Biblical and constitutional principles they hold dear, but without clear teaching from the pulpit about what the Bible says about marriage, life, or sex, how can we expect them to vote bearing these principles in mind?" PPN is a project of Let Freedom Ring, a nonprofit organization that promotes limited federal government, the "original intent of the Framers of the Constitution," free enterprise and equal opportunity, and family as the basic building block of society, among other things.

atrick - 25 March 2013

Now can you all say something about the man you were defending. U must all be from ETM or RMG's wives

Judah - 24 December 2013

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