Copac detractors eat humble pie

HARARE - They say experience is the best teacher, experience means the same mistakes will not be repeated.

For if the same pitfalls are to befall a nation again then that nation does not want to learn or has no such capacity or at least the willingness.

For some of us who remained optimistic that the constitution-making process would come to fruition, we were not really surprised that finally all the parties in the GPA are singing from the same hymn book.
The constitution-making process was an unstoppable train and all those who stood in the way or tried to have now  been reduced to spectators.

Some waged court battles and others spit venom on national television and disparaged the leaders of the constitution-making process.

As was said by one of the co-chairs of Copac, such people were enemies of progress who thought they had the monopoly to define the interests of the country and more still how they could be safeguarded. It was not to be as no individual is bigger than the community or country.

The basis for progress and harmony is compromise and accepting the otherness.

To fiercely oppose a process like this with unprecedented reactionalism is not a good attribute to those who purport to be nation builders.

After all why would people repeat the grave mistake they made in 2000 by rejecting the first homegrown Constitution Commission draft constitution?

That was a moment of madness which the majority voted “No” as it meant that as a nation we rejected our own starting point and we chose to be stuck with a colonialist-inspired document.  

As Zimbabweans, we should be a proud nation and acknowledge that we should make decisions and we should not be afraid or ashamed of it even if we make the wrong decisions, we should be bold enough to make them.
 
We can always learn and reflect on those decisions and rectify them as we progress along the way.

The current state of affairs baffle all and sundry. Why would the country continue to use a Constitution that was made by others and which would need to be amended more than a dozen times.

Those numerous amendments meant it had become dysfunctional and did not represent the collective will of the people.  

As the process is now unstoppable, we should really be happy that as a nation  we are speaking with one voice and ready to move own with confidence that we can take heed on the numerous challenges that our country faces as patriotic citizens while as it had become crystal clear that patriotism has no party.

We should emulate with envy the way white settlers celebrated the 1923 referendum that gave them a self-governing status.

Those whites who voted for the Responsible Government status and won were described as “patriots” who wanted “to prove themselves on their own.” The victory was an “occupier’s” victory as they went ahead to appropriate all the land to their benefit and free themselves from the “oppression” of company rule.

The breakthrough in the constitution-making process is a victory for all Zimbabweans who want to move forward and who realise that together we can achieve better things instead of wasting time disparaging each other.

An important lesson that we should learn is that for peace and progress in Zimbabwe we should be all winners, we should play to score collectively as we are a collective society as was witnessed by the solidarity during the death of Vice-President John Nkomo.

The call by all parties to vote “Yes” is a sign of maturity which we should all emulate and cherish.
 
Why should people choose disagreement when they can agree?

Our next test is of course to adhere to the principles of constitutionalism — living and enjoying the benefits of living under a democratic homegrown constitution. - Wellington Gadzikwa

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